What Does a Notary Public Do and Why?



Notary Publics are important to the legal system as lots of court files must be notarized. A notary public is an individual authorized by the Secretary of State to serve the public in non-contentious matters and has statutory powers to witness files, administer oaths, and perform other comprehensive administrative functions of a global and national nature. The primary functions of a notary include:

· Attesting files and accrediting their due execution for usage
· Preparing and accrediting powers of attorney, wills, deeds, contracts and other legal files
· Administering oaths
· Witnessing signatures to affidavits, statutory statements, powers of attorney, contracts, and other files
· Verifying files
· Accrediting copy files
· Exemplifying official documents
· Notes and demonstrations bills of exchange

A document is "notarized" with an unique embossed notary seal to affirm that the signers are undoubtedly who they say they are. Notaries Public attach their official seal or stamp, to files immediately under, nearby or as near as possible to their signatures.

The eligibility criteria for ending up being a notary are determined by state law. Each state has its own requirements. Normally the person should be at least 18 years of age and either living or be employed in the state. There are no particular legal training requirements. Most states also need applicants to take and pass a proctored test before practicing as a notary public. Some states ask that people protect a bond prior to obtaining a position as a notary public. As soon as commissioned as a notary public, the commission is valid for a set term and must be restored on expiry of the term. Many states prescribe the charges that a notary public can charge. A notary public should keep a record in a well-bound book of each of his or her attestations.

Notaries are notary lakeway expected to be acquainted with the ordinances and codes relevant to notarizing documents and performing notary tasks. If his/her actions were irresponsible, a notary might be sued. Upon notice by a law court that a notary has been convicted of incorrect accreditation, the Secretary of State will revoke the notary's commission. Omissions and mistakes Insurance coverage (commonly called E & O) is a type of liability insurance coverage that secures the notary public from claims or suits that are the result of the notary's irresponsible acts, mistakes or omissions.


A notary public is an individual licensed by the Secretary of State to serve the public in non-contentious matters and has statutory powers to witness files, administer oaths, and perform other extensive administrative functions of a nationwide and international nature. The majority of states also require applicants to take and pass a proctored test prior to practicing as a notary public. Notaries are anticipated to be familiar with the codes and regulations appropriate to notarizing documents and performing notary tasks. Upon alert by a court of law that a notary has actually been convicted of false certification, the Secretary of State will withdraw the notary's commission. Errors and Omissions Insurance (typically called E & O) is a kind of liability insurance that protects the notary public from claims or fits that are the result of the notary's negligent acts, errors or omissions.

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